The Muse of Spatter

Frequent readers of this blog will know that I really do enjoy a bit of spatter in my art work so I was very happy to learn that spatter was the basis of this week’s Life Book lesson.  The lesson was taken by Mandy Van Goeije and was about starting loose and abstract and then finding some form within that abstraction to turn into an illustration, generating text to support that illustration, and layering watercolour and other media on top of a splattery, puddly watercolour background.

I decided to use the primary colours for my spatter because it was what was demonstrated in the tutorial and because I recognised that it was a palette that I don’t often use.  I often add spatter at some stage in my art work but it was a twist on things to actually use the spatter as the starting point.  I am not someone who tends to get creatively blocked because of having a blank page but I imagine this is a good way to get past that problem.

16a Muse of Spatter

Once I had the spattery layer, I had to look for shapes and forms within it that suggested the starting point for an illustration.  It is human nature to see facial features in inanimate objects (a quick google told me it is called “pareidolia”) and it is something I certainly do.  When looking at my spattery layer, however, the form I saw emerge was a human figure – a tilted head surrounded by red hair and, in the negative space – upraised arms and hands.  I think my brain determining I would see a human figure is probably an extension of the same phenomenon that has people seeing faces.  When coming up with the story element of my art work and the text, I decided my figure should be the Muse of Spatter and wrote “The Muse of Spatter dances wherever she pleases and creates from chaos” as I felt that basically encapsulated the theme of the lesson and what I created as a result of it.

16b Muse of Spatter

Galaxy Girl

My response to this week’s Life Book lesson is an example of my commitment to share my art work from that course whether I like the outcome or not.  The lesson was taken by Susana Tavares and was about illustrating with watercolour and adding finishing details with pen.  It was a lesson that should have been comfortably within my wheelhouse but somehow I still went wrong.  I started with the face and struggled to render decent flesh tones.  I think I went too heavy with the ochre for the shadows, I didn’t maintain enough white paper for highlights, and I didn’t get the pinks looking rosy enough.  The hair was completed using a wet in wet technique and I definitely overdid it as it all feathered and bloomed more than I intended.  Straying from the exemplar in the tutorial, I decided the hair could be like the night sky, and I decided to string the planets from our solar system around her neck like a beaded necklace.  It was not a well thought through execution of the concept.  I don’t think it was a coincidence that I was completely over-scheduled and exhausted this week.  For me, art is a useful counterpoint to a stressful week but that does not mean the product is always as worthwhile as the act of creation itself.

12 Galaxy Girl

Blue Sisters

Last week’s Life Book lesson was taken by Tamara Laporte and involved drawing two figures.  I had not gotten around to working on Life Book lessons for a few weeks so I was keen to tackle this one over the weekend.  I find drawing more than one figure in a piece to be fairly challenging because of the need to make them cohere and keep proportions and angles of light consistent.  That was another good reason to complete the lesson.  I had to improvise a lot with the lesson because I don’t own the markers that Laporte demonstrated.  I, therefore, used ink and watercolour instead.  I tried to stay true to one of the focal points of the lesson, however, by working on creating a range of skin tones.  This is a skill I definitely still need to develop but I was nevertheless reasonably pleased with the flesh tones I created in this piece because at least I avoided making them too sallow or adding too much ochre.

9b Blue Sisters

A Bunny Timeline of European History

This week’s Art Journal Adventure prompt was Time which was ironic because it took me the entire week to find the time to even sit down at my art table.  I was, however, thinking about the prompt all week and had all sorts of ideas running around in my head.  I initially thought of time travel and HG Wells.  My 9 year old Steampunk fan was very keen on that idea but just the thought of drawing all sorts of cogs and gizmos made me feel stressed.  After that, I had all sorts of different ideas.  It was, however, a chat with a friend about our shared love of ‘Blackadder’ that led to what finally appeared on my journal page.  The idea of taking a character and plonking them in different periods of history combined with my habit of drawing funny bunnies.  I decided to limit myself to eight drawings and to European history so that it did not become a crazily big project.  Once I had the idea and some time at my art table, I was able to whip through the illustrations really quickly as they are just ink and watercolour.  I chose to depict a bunny as a neanderthal, Roman, Viking, in a Medieval costume complete with codpiece, as an Elizabethan with a large ruff, as a Regency dandy, as a Victorian gent, and as a World War One Tommy.

7a Bunny European History Timeline

7b Bunny European History Timeline

7c Bunny European History Timeline

7d Bunny European History Timeline

 

The Beatles – Art Journal Page

This week’s Art Journal Adventure prompt was “Here comes the sun”.  I wish!  This Winter has been so grey and dull that I am longing for sunshine.  The intention of the prompt was to create an art journal page featuring the sun.  However, as a Beatles fan, I just had the song lyrics playing over and over in my head and I decided to go down that path and create an illustration of The Beatles in my art journal.  My 9 year old is a huge Beatles fan so I let him choose the “era” that I would depict.  He chose the Sergeant Pepper era and I am glad he did as it made for a brightly coloured page.  I drew the illustration with fountain pen and added colour with watercolour.  It was fun reducing Ringo, John, Paul, and George to simplified shapes and trying to capture something of their looks and personalities.  I must admit I am rather pleased with how this drawing turned out.

4b The Beatles

Collage Hummingbird

There were two lessons in this week’s Life Book course and I managed to find time to complete one of them.  The object of the lesson was to create a piece inspired by a hummingbird incorporating collage as one of the media being utilised.  I have been using collage regularly as a background or otherwise visually minimal element but it has been a while since I have used collage papers as a prominent feature so that was fun.  I used origami papers for the wing and tail feathers and then drew with activated Inktense pencils over the top of the collage in order to make it cohere with the body, which I painted with watercolour.  It’s a simple piece in technique and outcome but it provided just the therapeutic decompression I needed in yet another over-scheduled week.

2 Hummingbird Collage

Each Day is a New Beginning

After five weeks, I finally managed to open my art journal and create a page.  This was thanks to me actually being able to go along to my art journal meet up group for the first time in months.  I decided to use the most recent Colour Me Positive art journal prompt as my jumping off point.  The prompt was the theme of “new beginnings”.  There are a lot of ways I could have chosen to interpret that prompt, from the personal to the more expansive and profound.  I chose, however, to think about the regular beats of life, its cycles and rhythms, and the idea of each passing day being a new beginning came to mind.  I decided to illustrate a winter sunrise.  I was actually going to keep the page monochromatic, just shades of black and grey, but one of the other ladies at the meet up suggested I add just a splash of colour to the sun so I added some yellow and orange.  I cannot decide if that was a positive step to take or not.  I think maybe yellow would have looked nice against the greys but not so much the orange.  But such experiments are precisely what an art journal is handy for.

49 - New Beginnings - Art Journal Page