White Rabbit

Last week’s Art Journal Adventure prompt was “Time”.  Time is a major stressor for me because I am perpetually over-scheduled, often needing to be in two places at once, and because I am a control freak who is neurotically punctual.  The conflict between those pragmatic and psychological states generates a whole load of mental exhaustion.  And that is precisely why I thought of the White Rabbit.  His being late has him strung out and fizzing with frenetic energy, so needing to propel himself that he is almost paralysed by how overwhelmed he is.  I can relate.

I went whimsical for this illustration.  I used old book pages as my substrate since the White Rabbit is, of course, a book character.  The brown hue of the paper then inspired the colour palette.  I think he looks pretty cute and surprisingly relaxed and cheery for someone who is running so late for a very important date.

10 - Time - White Rabbit - Art Journal

A Bunny Timeline of European History

This week’s Art Journal Adventure prompt was Time which was ironic because it took me the entire week to find the time to even sit down at my art table.  I was, however, thinking about the prompt all week and had all sorts of ideas running around in my head.  I initially thought of time travel and HG Wells.  My 9 year old Steampunk fan was very keen on that idea but just the thought of drawing all sorts of cogs and gizmos made me feel stressed.  After that, I had all sorts of different ideas.  It was, however, a chat with a friend about our shared love of ‘Blackadder’ that led to what finally appeared on my journal page.  The idea of taking a character and plonking them in different periods of history combined with my habit of drawing funny bunnies.  I decided to limit myself to eight drawings and to European history so that it did not become a crazily big project.  Once I had the idea and some time at my art table, I was able to whip through the illustrations really quickly as they are just ink and watercolour.  I chose to depict a bunny as a neanderthal, Roman, Viking, in a Medieval costume complete with codpiece, as an Elizabethan with a large ruff, as a Regency dandy, as a Victorian gent, and as a World War One Tommy.

7a Bunny European History Timeline

7b Bunny European History Timeline

7c Bunny European History Timeline

7d Bunny European History Timeline

 

Storytime at the Library

My oldest three sons started elementary school just four days after we arrived in the US.  They mumped and moaned about it a bit but actually they thrive on routine and structure and on time apart from each other and me so jumping straight into school was in their best interests socially and emotionally as well as academically.  The school is fantastic and they are really enjoying it and have settled well.  Unfortunately for my youngest son, we have not been able to identify an affordable preschool option at this juncture so he is stuck at home with me.  We are doing the home preschooling thing, of course, but that doesn’t involve him mixing with other children.  He had been in preschool five mornings a week in Scotland and loved it so it has been a difficult adjustment for him to be home with me all day.  So my aim, until such time as he is enrolled in a Pre-Kindergarten programme, is to take him along to as many child-oriented events as possible.  Thus, this morning we headed off to the library for a story time session.

In Scotland, my preschoolers had attended Bookbug sessions in our small, local library.  They were great fun, parents and children all sitting together being led in song and rhyme and having a picture book read to us by the leader.  It was subtly promoting literacy but was also about engaging parents with their children’s learning through play, about socialisation and about fun.  I guess I drove off to the library expecting the storytime session to be if not a carbon copy then very similar.  It turned out to be really quite different.

The immediate difference was that the session was held in a side room just off the children’s section of the library whereas in Scotland our local Bookbug sessions had taken over an area of the main library, albeit in the children’s area, so that other visitors had to just put up with our screechy, pitchy renditions of “Ally Bally” and “Pop a Little Pancake”.  The next difference was that the kids were ushered to sit on the floor on a comfy rug while the adults sat on chairs that lined the walls. This both suggested and enforced the children being separated or disengaged from the adults who had accompanied them.  It was all about the children and just the children.  The major difference was that there were no songs or rhymes at all in the storytime session (though I guess the clue was in the title) just lots and lots of books.  The man leading the session sat at the front of the library and read the stories to the children – and my youngest was rapt for the entire half hour – but also ensured that they understood concepts like cover, illustrator and half-title page, questioned them about the problems being encountered by characters and engaged them in analysis of patterns and illustrations.

I assume the library sessions in Scotland are run in the way they are because they are aimed at children below preschool age and that means under three whereas, in our current school district at least, a lack of affordable preschool provision means that sessions like this need to attract and engage children up to Kindergarten age (though the flyer said the age range was 3-6).  So instead of literacy being learned through song and rhyme in addition to story, a little more academic rigour is appropriate.  For me, it was strange not to be participating in the session and I felt quite redundant but my four year old was engaged throughout and that was the critical element.  Comparisons are unfair anyway and actually I have no preference for the style of session but it was certainly an interesting and enjoyable first experience and one we will repeat.