Inktober 2016 – #44 Rosemary’s Baby

I finally reached the final page of my Inktober sketchbook!  Finally my extension of Inktober could come to an end.  So many of my illustrations have been inspired by horror movies that I thought it would be fitting to close with another reference to a horror movie.  I decided to depict Rosemary’s Baby or how I want to imagine that little devil baby looks.  I think the resulting illustration is of a baby a wee bit monstrous but fairly adorable.

44 Inktober 2016 - Rosemary's Baby

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Inktober 2016 – #10 Red Demon

I turned to the Drawlloween prompts again for today’s Inktober drawing.  Today’s prompt was the punny “Demonday” so obviously that meant drawing a demon.  I definitely fell into stereotype territory with this one.  One of my sons suggested I should draw the Balrog from ‘Lord of the Rings – The Fellowship of the Ring’ but I would have had to have worked from a reference image so instead I used my cliche stuffed imagination to come up with a red demon with a tail, horns and cloven hooves.  Zero points for originality.

10 Inktober 2016 - Red Demon

Split-Pin Puppets

Making split-pin puppets has always been a big hit with the kids but we don’t do it frequently enough.  We tend to only make them when we have some sort of project on the go.  For example, we once made a set of gladiators and a lion when we were learning about ancient Rome and we have made fairytale characters to act out little story plays.  It may be because the split-pins (which I think are called paper fasteners here in the US) are tucked away in a stationery box in the study that I forget about them existing and, therefore, the creative possibilities for a rainy day.  In any case, when we plucked the “split-pin puppet” slip from the random box of activities, the kids were very happy.

Since we are not working on a project with a specific theme, the boys had complete freedom to choose what character they were going to make.  They selected some thick card to work on and I decided to experiment and use watercolour paper so that I could paint my puppet with watercolour.  We each drew our characters onto our chosen card being sure to make the tops of the limbs chunky enough to be able to attach the limb to the torso.  Then we cut out the individual pieces, coloured and decorated them, and then pushed the split-pins through in order to join all the pieces together in a way that enabled them all to articulate.  We used a drawing pin to make the holes so as to avoid any tears and to be super precise with the positioning of the holes.

My 10 year old, an utter comic book nerd, made Wolverine; my oldest and youngest sons chose to make random characters from their own imaginations; my 9 year old made a bright red demon; and I made a zombie.

Split Pin Puppet - Wolverine

Split Pin Puppet - Demon

Split Pin Puppet - Funny Guy

Split Pin Puppet - Weirdo

Split Pin Puppet - Zombie