Road Trip 2017 #28 – The Birds and Bodega Bay

Regular readers of this blog may recall that I am a movie nerd.  I have successfully managed to inspire my sons into being movie nerds too, especially the middle two kids.  I have not indoctrinated them, of course, but my enthusiasm for film has transferred to them and now we can all enjoy watching movies together, analysing them, comparing them, and obviously being entertained by them.  As a fan of Alfred Hitchcock, I have given my kids a gentle introduction to his movies.  We started with ‘The Trouble with Harry’, then moved on to ‘Rear Window’, and then ‘The Birds’.  When I told them that we would be staying in the area where ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ (which they have not seen) and ‘The Birds’ were filmed, they were eager to go and visit the locations.  I was happy to oblige.  Mr Pict had accompanied me on the same mission 17 years before so was also happy to indulge us this time.

We decided to focus on Bodega and Bodega Bay since the kids had actually seen ‘The Birds’ and would recognise the locations.   When we reached Bodega, we drove up to the church and parked up.  The kids and I got out and wandered the few yards to the Potter House.  This is a private residence so, rest assured, we were careful not to be intrusive or to cause a commotion.  The house was built in 1873 and originally served as a schoolhouse and it served as the school building in the Hitchcock movie, the set of an important scene in the film and, therefore, featuring prominently.  Of course, we could not resist acting out the film but we wanted to be respectful of the local residents so we acted it out as if it had been a silent movie.  My kids are such ham actors.  St Theresa’s church can be glimpsed during that scene so we took some photos and reenacted some silent action scenes there too.

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The movie creates the impression that the schoolhouse and church are right on the coast but, in fact, Bodega is a short drive inland from the bay.  We, therefore, jumped back in the car and headed to Bodega Bay.  The main focus of our visit to the town was the Tides Restaurant.  It plays a prominent role in the movie and is still identifiable as the key location, despite being remodelled a fair bit since the 1960s.  When I was last there, it felt very much like Bodega Bay barely tolerated the Hitchcock connection.  Apart from one leaflet, there was nothing that declared the place to have been related to the movie.  This time, however, it appeared that the town had embraced the movie as a tourist opportunity.  Inside the Tides there were ample references to the film, from stuffed ravens to a mock up of a building with smashed windows.  More opportunities for ham acting, in other words.  The kids bought some ice lollies and we stepped out onto the back deck to look at the bay.  We could see the spit of land opposite where the Brenner house stood (it was torn down immediately after filming), the road where Tippi Hedren drove out to that house, and the jetty where she rented a boat to cross the bay.

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Once everyone had finished their iced treats, we jumped back in the car and headed along the coastal road to Salmon Creek Beach.  It was early evening by this juncture and the air was distinctly chilly.  There was no way the kids were even going to go for a paddle, let alone a swim.  However, we found a new way to keep them entertained.  The beach was covered with little huts that had been built out of driftwood.  They were really great, really competently built structures.  I don’t know who had erected them and for what purpose but I do know they would fare a lot better than I would if marooned on a desert island.  That inspired my kids to gather up driftwood and build their own structure.  We ran out of time before they got anywhere near completed but it kept them entertained for over an hour.  They also found a washed up, decaying cow carcass.  I am sure most people’s kids would recoil at such a discovery but my kids reacted like they had found buried treasure and studied the corpse, fascinated.  It’s possible I have exposed them to too much Hitchcock after all.

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8 thoughts on “Road Trip 2017 #28 – The Birds and Bodega Bay

  1. Looks like they are great actors – love the poses!! I love Hitchcock movies so would really have enjoyed this day out Laura. Relieved those birds didn’t make an appearance though…

    • You can do a whole DIY tour of Hitchcock locations in that area. That’s what I did back in 2000. In addition to Bodega Bay, we stayed in Santa Rosa (Shadow of a Doubt), visited the mission at San Juan Bautista (Vertigo), and the Vertigo locations within San Francisco. I hadn’t made it to the Muir Woods (also Vertigo) last time and – spoiler alert – failed this time too. One day I’ll get there.

  2. You guys crack me up! I just love that you all re-create movie scenes whenever possible, and the Silent Birds is a classic. It’s also really wonderful that they are so curious about things like cow carcasses. Well, curious about so many things. Someone commented a few days ago about what great parents you two are and I wholeheartedly agree.

    • Thank you, Ellie. That’s so kind of you to say. I certainly have deficits as a parent – I just don’t think it worth blogging about my daily yelling at children to get their shoes on or the fact I don’t even feign interest in some things they are interested in, like Minecraft – but I think overall we are making a fairly good fist of this parenting lark and our personal experiment in trying to raise functioning human beings. I think our main strength is that we encourage our kids to be fully and completely themselves as individuals, even when their clothing choices make my OCD vibrate. But, of course, we won’t know if we’ve done a successful job or not until they are all fully fledged adults and it’s too late.

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